600-word report on the magazine industry.

The magazine industry produces periodicals and magazines in both print and digital format. The consumer market for magazines is vast, ranging from individuals to professionals and tradespeople. According to Ibis World’s UK Market Research Report of May 2018 the UK magazine industry is currently worth approximately £4 billion. It employs 32, 677 people in over 2,500 businesses.

The Professional Publishers Association represents the interests of magazine publishers in the UK. Their membership consists of almost 400 publishers who provide more than 2,260 consumer, business and professional magazines. This represents 80 per cent of the UK magazine market in turnover. However, there are over 8,000 titles published in the UK which cover many different genres and types.

Magazines can be categorised into the following sectors:

Consumer– these can be general titles for entertainment or information such as Take a Break or Glamour. They can also be specialist or specific interest for example Coarse Fishing or Gardener’s World. 90% are sold in newsagents and supermarkets. The four main consumer magazine publishers (by newsagent sales revenue) are Bauer, IPC (Time Warner), Burda and National Magazines. There are about 2,800 consumer magazines in the UK.

Consumer magazines comprise approximately 85% of the industry. The remaining 15% of the market consist of:

Business / trade / professional / B2B – over 5,000 titles in the UK

Customer magazines – produced by publishing agencies as a form of marketing. Many large supermarkets such as Tesco and Asda provide free customer magazines. These cover a much larger circulation than the top selling consumer magazines as they are so widely circulated. Sky the Magazine had a circulation of 7 million copies monthly.

Newspaper supplements – free with daily or Sunday newspapers. Produced by most of the national newspapers in the UK.

Part works – specific number of issues on a particular subject to form a collection.

Academic journals – subject matter is controlled by academic boards.

The two main sources of revenue for magazines are print sales and advertising. Over the past decade print sales have declined due to significant online competition. There has also been a decline in print readership and external factors such as real household disposable income effect magazine sales.

The Internet has changed the landscape of traditional magazine publishing. Nowadays readers expect information 24-7 which paperless, digital news delivers. Many well-known magazines such as Newsweek and  Instyle  have ceased to produce their print editions.

Certain areas of the declining magazine industry, such as men’s magazines, reflect the way young people are now consuming magazines digitally. This has also been seen in music magazines as information is so freely available on the net. (Spin magazine went digital in December 2012.) TV magazine sales have fallen due to the availability of tv guides on our televisions or free supplements with newspapers. Paid for UK magazines audited by ABC lost sales at an average rate of 5.9 per cent year on year in 2017. Condé Nast saw their biggest circulation falls in 2016 reporting its titles down 8.9% year on year.

Women’s lifestyle magazines have taken a big hit with Healthy, Look and Women’s Fitness sales dropping by at least a fifth. Sales of Marie Claire, Grazia and Health & Fitness magazines all fell by at least 10 per cent.

Kevin Petley, Business Director of Hello magazine says, “Magazines are under threat, the days of the massive sellers are gone, and if we ignore this fact, we do so at our own peril. There has never been a more relevant time for magazines to demonstrate their value and relevance as a whole, to both consumers and advertisers.”

The following table shows the Top 10 Magazines by sales in the UK and Ireland according to the latest ABC statistics as of August 2018. It illustrates falling sales figures.

Magazine sales

Nevertheless, in certain areas such as independent, specialist or ‘niche’ markets the magazine publishing industry is flourishing. Another growing sector is children’s magazines; pre-teen titles have increased their combined circulation by 12.4 per cent. Whilst sales of Private Eye reached 105,077 in 2016, an increase of 16.6%, indicating that current affairs remain one of the strongest magazine sectors.

The magazine industry continues to change and diversify. Whilst print sales decline, digital editions form a significant part of magazine sales. In order to compete in a transient market magazine publishers need to adapt their business models accordingly.

 

References

PPA. (2018). About The PPA. [online] Available at: http://www.ppa.co.uk/about/about-the-ppa [Accessed 24 Sep. 2018].

Forbes.com. (2016). [online] Available at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/berlinschoolofcreativeleadership/2016/08/01/mr-magazine-on-why-print-magazines-just-wont-die/#63cef8fe6d4c [Accessed 25 Sep. 2018].

The Guardian. (2015). Cat People, Riposte and Works that Work: the niche world of indie magazines. [online] Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/media/shortcuts/2015/apr/06/cat-people-riposte-and-works-that-work-the-niche-world-of-indie-magazines [Accessed 25 Sep. 2018].

Hatads.org.uk. (2016). Collection Details. [online] Available at: https://www.hatads.org.uk/catalogue/professional-bodies/65/Professional-Publishers-Association-PPA [Accessed 24 Sep. 2018].

Campaignlive.co.uk. (2017). Condé Nast suffers biggest audience decline as magazine market drops 6%. [online] Available at: https://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/conde-nast-suffers-biggest-audience-decline-magazine-market-drops-6/1423814 [Accessed 25 Sep. 2018].

Trade Press Services. (2016). Is the Magazine Publishing Industry Dead? – Trade Press Services. [online] Available at: http://www.tradepressservices.com/magazine-publishing-industry-dead/ [Accessed 24 Sep. 2018].

Ibisworld.co.uk. (2018). Magazine Publishers (UK) – Industry Research Reports | IBISWorld. [online] Available at: https://www.ibisworld.co.uk/industry-trends/market-research-reports/information-communication/publishing-activities/magazine-publishers.html [Accessed 24 Sep. 2018].

BetterRetailing.com. (2018). Top 100 magazines. [online] Available at: https://www.betterretailing.com/category-management/top-100-magazines [Accessed 24 Sep. 2018].

Pressgazette.co.uk. (2017). UK magazine ABCs: Winners, losers and full breakdown as circulation declines average 6 per cent – Press Gazette. [online] Available at: https://www.pressgazette.co.uk/uk-magazine-abcs-winners-losers-and-full-breakdown-as-circulation-declines-average-6-per-cent/ [Accessed 25 Sep. 2018].

Magforum.com. (2018). UK Magazines | Magforum | Magazines and Magazine Publishers. [online] Available at: http://www.magforum.com/ukmagazines.htm [Accessed 27 Sep. 2018].

Bradinsight.com. (2018). What is BRAD? | BRAD Insight: BRAD Insight. [online] Available at: https://bradinsight.com/about-us/what-brad/ [Accessed 24 Sep. 2018].

 

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Feedback Forms

This was my feedback from David Fewster, the Managing Director of Beverley FM.

Beverley Fm Feedback

I worked on two separate occasions for The Scarborough News. This was my overall feedback from Susan Stephenson, the News Editor.

Scarborough News Feedback

 

Overall Evaluation of Work Experience

For my second year I completed the requisite two weeks of work experience with The Scarborough News and Beverley FM. I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to work within the newspaper print industry and  also in radio broadcasting.

During my time at The Scarborough News I was able to gain experience in working in a busy newsroom along with five of their main reporters. I worked on various features and events in the Scarborough area and had work published both in the newspaper and on their website.

On two occasions I went out with their photographer, Richard Ponter, who is now the sole photographer for all of the 5 newspapers published at The Scarborough News as well as for the Yorkshire Post. I felt privileged to spend time with him because he is a true professional and I learnt a lot from him. Most particularly the way he connects with people, quickly judges a situation, creates an image in his mind and then captures photos that bring a story to life. I found it refreshing to work with a photographer in an age where everyone clicks happily on their phones without even thinking about composition or the basic rules of photography.

I also went out on another project with the senior reporter, Poppy Kennedy. We interviewed several people involved in a housing project in Scarborough which is a huge construction, with shops, schools, care homes. The whole infrastructure which covers 400 acres of land is virtually a new town. This gave me an insight into how varied the role of a reporter can be. I enjoyed being given the opportunity to meet people in a very different setting.

Working at Beverley FM has given me the possibility of working in radio which is something that I had never previously considered. I did some work for them covering the Tour de Yorkshire, broadcasting live from Hornsea. I also did several interviews and recorded these for use on the radio.

I will be working at the radio over the summer on news stories for Beverley and the surrounding areas. I have sat in on various presenters to gain a feel of how it works and have been given the opportunity to present shows in the future. What is particularly exciting for me is that they are hoping to extend their coverage to the Hornsea area. They would like me to be involved in this project and want me to gather news stories from Hornsea and create local interest. They have also asked if I would be able to update their website which could be part of my project work for next year.

To summarise, I have found the work experience extremely rewarding and enjoyable. I have made new contacts, worked on the skills that I have learnt and also learnt new ones.

Transgender-2 different documentary approaches

As part of our work on documentary we were asked to reflect on fictional, documentary and journalistic approaches to non- fiction. I looked at two different perspectives on the subject of transgenderism. They are both based on the same topic but each one illustrates a different documentary style.

I first looked at a Louis Theroux documentary because I like his work. He presents things as they are without needing to embellish the facts. He also remains impartial and allows the viewer to make up their own minds. For me, many of his documentaries, whilst often controversial, have a feeling of timelessness. If you look at some of his older documentaries they are still relevant today.

LT

Louis Theroux: Transgender Kids provides an insightful and thought-provoking look into gender dysphoria. It was written and presented by Louis Theroux and, like most of his documentaries, was researched and documented over a period of time. The film was released in the UK in 2015 and caused some controversy, particularly among the transgender community who didn’t like the focus on such young children. However, I think this adds to the appeal. It makes the viewer feel uncomfortable at times but this is what provokes thought and question.

Louis Theroux travels to San Francisco where a group of pioneering medical professionals help children who say they were born in the wrong body transition from boy to girl or girl to boy at ever younger ages. He follows three families with children of different ages and in each case the filming takes place in their home surroundings. This is one of the reasons that the documentary remains true to life and, although the subject is something we may know little about, it gives credibility to the facts being presented. You can see that the interviewees are more relaxed and  that they are at ease with Louis, and confident enough to let him into their homes.

lt in home

The documentary opens with a scene that both surprises and intrigues the viewer. With Louis’ question:  ” Do you think you are happier as Camille or Sebastian?”

opening shot

Louis goes on to talk with Camille and her parents who respond, honestly and openly. In the space of a month, five-year old Sebastian changed his name to Camille and wanted to be seen as a girl.

Through a journalistic approach the documentary presents  the unspoken truth about a section of society largely ignored and misunderstood. The question raised is what decision parents should make when choosing whether or not their child is too young to know if they want to be a boy or a girl.

In this film Louis Theroux shows his skill in creating a great rapport with the people he interviews and getting information from them that they thought would never be shared. He maintains fluid conversation, somehow always keeping the situation natural.

What I particularly like about this documentary is Louis Theroux’s unique angle on a highly controversial topic. He manages to present the facts in an impartial but sensitive way through his empathy with the people he interviews.

Louis Theroux remains calm throughout the documentary, he never raise his voice or interrupts. The tone of his voice is always on the same pitch and he questions without being probing or judgemental. He rarely shows much emotion but you can see that he empathises with his subjects. He also becomes part of the story as it unfolds, sharing intimate thoughts and feelings of all involved as well as in their daily activities. He observes, presents the facts but also participates in the documentary.

It is extremely touching when he shares his own thoughts: ‘When I was 14 and turning 15, that was probably the hardest year of my life, it really was’. It was clear he was touched by the challenges these young individuals were facing.

shares insight

It is a long documentary but there is plenty to keep the viewer interested, moving at a steady pace and changing location from homes, to clinics, hospitals and stunning views of San Francisco.

There are a few scenes that may shock the viewer but they add authenticity and are presented in a way that makes these things almost normal. As they are for those involved.

the use of a forearm to create a phallus for a transitioning female to male

Puberty blocker implant

A boy of 14 has a puberty blocker implant to prevent his breasts from growing

The documentary continues with Louis visiting the families four months later. Filming over time shows change but also continuity. It is important to show the progress of these young people, the viewer has been given an insight into their lives and wants to know more..will there be a happy ending?

The documentary ends with Louis’ concluding, thought-provoking statement:

“The choice to transition involves the possibility of social rejection and a lifetime commitment to medication, but it is also a chance to exercise the most fundamental right we have – the right to be ourselves. In the end, the hardest part of the challenge may be knowing who it is we really are.”

In contrast to this I looked at a short documentary called ‘The Swimming Club’ by Cecilia Golding and Nick Finegan.

The Swimming Club

“The Swimming Club”, follows participants at Tags (‘Trans and Gender non-conforming Swimmers’ Group) in London. This documentary looks at transgenderism from a completely different angle. It is not about the physical process of transition but the cruelty and indifference of the spaces around them.

powerful visuals
The empty swimming pool and deep water sign are a poignant reminder of how many transgender people feel in public places. Exposed and like a fish out of water.

As one transgender male explains: “When I speak of my transition, I increasingly find it less interesting to talk about how I have changed but how the world around me did. Places that once felt comfortable – the bus stop, the gym, the beach – suddenly became places of fear. Where I had once been pleasantly invisible, I was now on show and up for discussion.”

All of the filming takes place in the same location both inside and out of the water. There are many close up shots which make you feel like you want to be there yourself. To dive under the water and feel the freedom it allows.

underwatercalm, soothing

The documentary is extremely visual and with the blue colours of the water and surrounding pool area the viewer is lulled into the calming nature of this environment. The soothing music helps to enhance the atmosphere. The narration provides the story but the visuals create the true feeling and emotion of this documentary.

The voice over is narrated by various members of the club who say a little about themselves without going in to great detail. I feel that this gives us a really special and personal insight into how difficult it must be living in a world where you feel unaccepted.

I love the analogy of the safeness of the water: ” We all come from the womb, the first 9 months of our lives we’re encased in water.”

womb

One of the swimmers in the club explains how the scrutiny of trans people’s bodies and their meaning quickly transforms into the language of oppression: “They say that we’re unnatural, that we’re perverted, that we’re not genuine people.”

The swimming club provides a place where transgender people can feel safe. A place where trans people – who are rarely allowed to enjoy their bodies – do so together. The ‘together’ is important, the sharing with others at the swimming club. Shame works by isolation and in this film we see Tags combatting it with the freedom, fun and laughter of community.

group activity

This is a short but powerful documentary. It is bitter-sweet because we see the joy and happiness in this place, yet we are reminded of the cruelty of others and the world in which we live. So often people who are ‘different’ are seen as a threat but this film puts everyone on to the same level. It is heart-warming, uplifting and endearing.

hopeful

Here’s the full film, watch and enjoy!

The Swimming Club from Cecilia Golding on Vimeo.

 

Evaluation of Specialist News Story

My specialist news story is written for those who have an interest in both winter sports and music festivals. The title refers to ‘rock’ music and ‘ride’ which is the terminology for snowboarding  These winter festivals have become big business in most of the major European ski resorts, some aiming at bringing Ibiza to the mountains with big name groups and DJs.

Chamonix has tended to steer clear of this sort of event but realising what this can mean for tourism, have chosen an event more suited to their resort. The festivals attract a different clientele and often help to boost the economy in quieter weeks of the ski season, usually towards the end when snow conditions are poor.

I heard about the festival, in December when I visited Chamonix. The event was already widely publicised and attracting a lot of interest. I got most of the information and quotations from the Chamonix Tourist Office whilst there.

The article could be published in the English section of  ‘Le Dauphiné Libéré’, which is an equivalent to ‘The Yorshire Post’. It would appeal to readers of many of the snowboard/ski magazines such as Snowboarder’, ‘Whitelines’ and ‘The Telegraph Ski and Snowboard’ magazine. It could also be featured in ‘Mountain Festivals: A Complete Guide’ webpage or in the travel supplement of any UK newspaper.

 

Evaluation of Proper Feature

For my proper feature I chose to focus on the current bank closures in the UK. It is a subject that has frequently been in the news headlines and something that affects many small communities.

I was invited to attend a coffee morning for pensioners which is held on Monday mornings in Hornsea. The guest speaker was Amanda Smith, the newly appointed NatWest Community Banker. She talked about the closure of the Hornsea branch and her role in giving support and guidance to its customers.

I had intended to do my short documentary film on the subject. Unfortunately it was extremely noisy and the footage that I took was not suitable. I therefore decided that this would be a good topic for  a feature story.

I took some of the quotations from the people I interviewed and put a question to the ‘Hornsea Rant and Info’ group on Facebook about people’s’ thoughts on the imminent bank closures in Hornsea. As you can imagine, I got a lot of response, some not printable, as the group has over 9,000 members which constitutes more than the Hornsea population.

I did further research into the bank closures to get statistical information to validate the story.

Although the story focuses on just one town, it is something that is happening in many other small towns across the UK so has a wider appeal. It could be published in he business section of a local newspaper such as The Yorkshire Post or in a weekend supplement of one of the larger papers such as The Guardian or The Observer.

Specialist News Story

Rock and Ride-Snow Problem at Chamonix Mont Blanc

Festival

A new pop-rock festival will take place at the foot of Mont Blanc this spring.

Scottish pop-rock band Texas are set to kick off the event along with UK new wave band Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark.

Chamonix, the French alpine capital, will host the event which will be staged in the ‘Bois du Bouchet’ paragliding landing station at an altitude of 1040 metres.

The festival takes place over three days from 19-21 April 2018. Seven bands will feature each day, from mid-afternoon until midnight, covering a wide spectrum of musical genres and nationalities. From the blues of Ben Harper to Swiss rocker, Stephan Eicher, French electro group, Synapson and  neo-blues and soul from Rag ‘n’ one Man.

Musilac Mont-Blanc is co-produced by the Chamonix Valley Tourist Office, Rémi Perrier Organization (Musilac Aix-les-Bains) and Mont-Blanc Media. For the past 16 summers Musilac has been rocking the shores of the Bourget Lake in Aix-les-Bains. Building on its success the organisers of this major French festival wanted to launch a winter version of the event.

Rémi Perrier, the co-founder of Musilac said: “We were approached by the Chamonix Tourist board who put forward the idea of taking the festival to the mountains. We have been contacted by several ski resorts over the years, with similar proposals, but the opportunity for a festival to take place in the majestic surroundings of the Mont Blanc entranced us.

This year will be our 17th summer in Aix-les-Bains and we wanted to create a festival with the same ethos: musical moments in magical places. The shores of the Bourget lake are magical as is, of course, Chamonix Mont Blanc.”

Music festivals have become very popular in ski resorts, attracting a clientele who want to combine their passion for both music and ski-ing/snowboarding.

Nicolas Durochat, tourist office manager, said: “Our goal is to build a festive and popular event by and for the inhabitants of the Chamonix Valley. The vocation of the event, built around the concept of rock & ride, is to highlight and enhance the appeal of spring skiing in an exceptional environment.”

With its impressive line-up, the festival has turned out to be one of the most eagerly awaited  for events for this small town of just under 9,000 residents. Over 40,000 festival-goers are expected to attend over the three days.